SIGNS & SIGNALS

Signs

End of Line

Z1

A D0 sign

D0

A D1 sign

D1

D6

D6

W1

W1

W4

W4

W5

W5

W6

W6

W8

W8

W9

W9

W11a

W11a

W11p

W11p

W14

W14

W15

W15

W16

W16

W17

W17

W27

W27

We1

We1

We2

We2

We3

We3

We4

We4

We8

We8

We9

We9

Signals

Mechanical Signals

Semaphore

Semaphore

Distance Signal

Distance Signal

Shunting Signal

Shunting Signal

Light Signals

Light Signal

Light Signal

Hand Signals

Coming soon

SIGNS

Z1 Sign

End Of Line

Track closed

Track closed signs are posted at the very end of the line, attached to buffers where the sidings end. You can also find them near derailers and turntables.
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D0 Sign

A D0 Sign

D0 Sign

D0 signs are portable signs used to alert a driver that a D1 stop sign is coming up shortly. These are usually placed at the station’s stopping distance +200m, before the D1.
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D1 Sign

A D1 Sign

D1 Sign

The D1 sign is used in various cases: if there is an obstacle on the tracks; the track is so badly damaged, the driver can’t go faster than 10 km/h; temporary closure of the track; if the upcoming semaphore is busted etc. These will often be accompanied by rail workers, who will instruct you on what you should be doing. By the time you reach this sign you should be on the verge of stopping.
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D6 Sign

D6: Speed limit 30km/h

D6: Speed limit 30km/h

D6: Speed limit 70km/h

D6: Speed limit 70km/h

D6 signs are used to inform drivers of an upcoming temporary speed limit, such as when sections of track are undergoing repair. The number is posted in 10s of km/h, so 3 is 30km/h etc. They are paired with the W14 signs, which designate the start and end of the reduced speed area. The most common of these you’ll come across are the 30km/h ones.
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W1 Sign

W1 Sign

W1 Sign

The W1 is found with the Distance signal. It’s used to draw extra attention to that signal.
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W4 Sign

W4 Sign

W4 Sign

The W4 sign is used to show the end of a station’s platform. Passenger trains stopping at that platform must come to a halt within 15m of the W4 sign.
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W5 Sign

W5 Sign

W5 Sign

The W5 is used to permanently mark the boundaries of the station while shunting. No locomotives are permitted past these signs whilst shunting.
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W6 Sign

W6 Sign

W6 Sign

W6 with Car

W6 with Car

The W6 is a generic sign used when drivers should sound their horns, such as when approaching tunnels. W6 signs with cars on them are specifically for road crossings. All drivers are required to sound their horns when they pass a W6. W6 signs with cars are placed on all types of road crossings (Level crossings get extra signs).
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W8 Sign

W8 30km/h

W8 30km/h

W8 70km/h

W8 70km/h

The W8 signs are used to imform drivers of upcoming permanent speed limited areas. The number is posted in 10s of km/h, so 3 is 30km/h etc. They are paired with, and found at the braking distance before, the W9 signs, which designate the start and end of the reduced speed area.
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W9 Sign

W9 Start

W9 Start

W9 End

W9 End

W9 signs are used to mark the beginning and end of permanently speed limited zones. These are always preceeded by a W8 sign. Drivers must be travelling at the speed designated by the W8 before reaching the W9. These areas are noted in the Permanent Limits List, and are taken into account when constructing timetables.
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W11a Sign

a picture of the W11a with 4 stripes

W11a – 4

a picture of a W11a sign with 3 stripes

W11a – 3

W11a with 2 stripes

W11a – 2

W11a with 1 stripe

W11a – 1

W11p signs are used to bring extra attention to approaching level crossings. They are set 200m apart from each other.
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W11p Sign

W11p - 2

W11p – 2

W11p - 1 W11a signs are used to bring extra attention to semaphores which may not be continuously visible for the distance between the distance signal and the semaphore, such as with curving tracks. They will always count downward from 4 or 3 stripes.
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W14 Sign

W14 Start

W14 Start

W14 End

W14 End

W14 signs are used to mark the beginning and end of temporary speed limited zones. These are always preceeded by a D6 sign. Drivers must be travelling at the speed designated by the D6 before reaching the W14.
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W15 Sign

W15 - Left

W15 – Left

W15 - Right

W15 – Right

The W15 signs are used when signals such as semaphores, are positioned on the wrong side of the track. The arrow points to the signal.
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W16 Sign

W16 Sign

W16 Sign

The W16 sign is used to forewarn passenger train drivers of upcoming stations, so they can prepare to stop if they are sheduled to stop there. Note, the W16 can also appear with inverted colours, as seen on the Quick Reference Sheet.
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W17 Sign

W17

W17

The tiny W17 sign is most often found between two joining tracks. This marks the occupancy boundary, the limit of where trains can go without the risk of colliding with trains on the other track.
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W27 Sign

W27

W27 – 30 km/h

The W27 signs indicate the maximum route speed from that point on. Not to be confused with the W8, which controls small sections, the W27 coversa lot more distance.
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W28 Sign

W28

W28

The W28 indicates that drivers should which their radio to the designated channel and establish communitcation to the dispatcher in control of that block on that channel. In Train Driver 2, this sign is purely decorative.
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We1 Sign

We1

We1

The We1 is attached to the catenary, 500m ahead of the We2. It indicates that drivers should slow down to 60 km/h and prepare to lower the pantographs.
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We2 Sign

We2

We2

The We2 is attached to the catenary, and is always preceeded by a We1. Drivers should lower their pantographs. It is used when a section of the catenary is switched off, or if drivers shouldn’t touch the catenary accidentally. It is placed 100m before the point where pantographs should be lowered.
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We3 Sign

We3

We3

We3 signs are found attched to the catenary, and indicate when drivers can raise their pantographs again. They are usually set 200m after the earliest point pantographs are able to be raised safely.
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We4 Sign

We4

We4

We4 signs are attached to the catenary, and indicated that electrical powered stock must not enter. These are placed wherever the catenary ends, or in the case of damage or repairs being performs on the catenary. Drivers of electical powered trains must stop and contact the dispatcher for instructions.
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We8 Sign

We8

We8

Attached to the catenary, the We8 is placed 30 before the the boundary of the catenary block. This is where the catenary changes where it gets it’s power from, and you don’t want to draw power from both sources or you’ll fry your locomotive. Drivers should stop drawing power from the catenary by completely releasing the throttle and coasting forward.
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We9 Sign

We9

We9

The We9 can be found attached to the catenary 200m after it is safe to begin drawing power again. Drivers can begin drawing power by increasing the throttle.
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Signals

Mechanical Semaphore

SR1 Signal

SR1 Signal


Semaphore SR1 Signal

The SR1 indicates there is no clear route ahead and the driver must stop.

SR2 Signal

SR2 Signal


Semaphore SR2 Signal

The SR2 signals that the route ahead is clear and the driver can proceed at the maximum speed designated for that route. Also known as a ‘Highball’ signal.

SR3 Signal

SR3 Signal


Semaphore SR3 Signal

The SR3 is used to signal the route is clear and drivers should proceed at a maximum of 40km/h until they have passed the last switch protected by that semaphore, after which they can travel at the maximum designated speed for that route.

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Distance Signal

OT1 Signal

OT1 Signal


Distance OT1 Signal

Distance signals are used to forward drivers what the next upcoming Semaphore will read. The OT1 Signal shows that the next semaphore is showing an SR1 or ‘Stop’ signal. Drivers should slow and prepare to stop.

OT2 Signal

OT2 Signal


Distance OT2 Signal

The OT2 Signal shows that the next upcoming semaphore will be displaying an SR2 or ‘Proceed’ signal, and the driver may continue through at the maximum designated speed for that route.

OT3 Signal

OT3 Signal


Distance OT3 Signal

The OT3 Signal shows that the next upcoming semaphore will be showing an SR3 or a ‘Proceed with speed limit’ signal. Drivers need to slow down and be travelling at a maximum of 40 km/h by the time they reach the paired semaphore.

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Shunting Signal

M1 Signal

M1 Signal


Shunting M1 Signal

The M1 Signal is used to show there is no clear route for shunting and shunting is prohibited.

M2 Signal

M2 Signal


Shunting M2 Signal

The M2 Signal is used to show the route is clear for shunting.

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Light Signals

Light based signals can also be used in the place of mechanical semaphores. They have the added advantage if being able to show more information than the mechanical semphores, such as a greater variety and combination of speeds.

The key thing to remember about the light based signals, is that although there are many different configurations of the lights, it’s what is displayed that is important. We’ve chosen the 5-light ones to show the signals on, but could just as easily used, 2, 3, or 4 light signals. It doesn’t matter.

Solid Unblinking Light

Unblinking Light

Blinking Light

Blinking Light

Stop

Stop

Stop


This one is pretty self explanatory. Drivers should slow down and stop.
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Proceed with extreme caution

Extreme Caution

Sz – Extreme Caution


In the event of hardware failure, obstruction on the tracks, or even a train crash, and the driver’s safety cannot be guaranteed, the Sz signal is shown. The Sz signal is the single flashing white light. Other lights may be lit alongside it, and if so, those lights are to be ignored. It should only be shown in the most extreme cases. Abuse of this signal has lead to train crashes in the past. Drivers must slow to 40km/h and be prepared to stop.
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Light Semaphore Chart

Again, the total amount of lights on the signal doesn’t matter, only what ones are shown. Below is a chart of all the different semaphore you can come across. They always show two things, what speed you should be going at, and what the next signal will show.

Chart of common light signals

Common light semaphores

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